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Learning outcomes framework

Key Competency Areas

The curriculum covers nine broad competency areas. These nine key areas relate to the three domains of public health practice (health protection, health improvement and service quality) and are derived from a description of what a consultant in public health is able to do, in what setting and how they deliver their service.

The nine key areas are:

  • Key Area 1: Surveillance and assessment of the population's heath and wellbeing.
  • Key Area 2: Assessing the evidence of effectiveness of health and healthcare interventions, programmes and services.
  • Key Area 3: Policy and strategy development and implementation.
  • Key Area 4: Strategic leadership and collaborative working for health.
  • Key Area 5: Health Improvement.
  • Key Area 6: Health Protection.
  • Key Area 7: Health and Social Service Quality.
  • Key Area 8: Public Health Intelligence.
  • Key Area 9: Academic Public Health.

Learning outcomes

The Learning Outcomes Framework is the portion of the curriculum which outlines the competencies, or learning outcomes, that specialty registrars in public health need to attain in order to complete their training.

Each key area consists of a number of learning outcomes. These cover the skills, attitudes and expertise expected of a consultant in public health and outline what the registrar will know, understand, describe, recognise, be aware of and be able to do at the end of training.

Some learning outcomes use words such as 'complex', 'weight', etc which are defined in the glossary and give a greater description of the level of attainment expected. The learning outcomes framework should therefore be read in conjunction with the glossary.

Learning outcomes are divided into:

  • core learning outcomes (those which every registrar must have to gain a CCT)
    and
  • specialist interest registrar-selected learning outcomes (these areas of optional special interest are available in addition to the core and allow development of special interest either in a particular area of public health practice or in a particular setting).

The learning outcomes are in turn mapped to:

  • the target phase of training in which they should be achieved;
  • the related Knowledge and Skills Framework competency;
  • suitable assessment methods;
  • related key areas.

Good public health practice

The learning outcomes framework also includes a section on Good Public Health Practice which describes the behaviours and attitudes necessary for professional practice. This is referred to as Ethical management of self and Professionalism.

Target phase of achievement

This is the point in training (i.e. phase 1, 2 or 3) by which most registrars must achieve the outcome. It does not necessarily preclude a registrar achieving outcomes earlier but may act as a trigger for remediation if the outcome is significantly delayed. Where a target phase indicated covers multiple phases, the registrar is expected to provide evidence of achievement at each level. A full description of the Phases of Training can be found on the FPH website.

Knowledge and Skills Framework

Since public health specialist training is a multi-disciplinary programme, open to graduates from medicine and other disciplines, registrars from backgrounds other than medicine are employed under Agenda for Change Terms and Conditions.

The NHS Knowledge and Skills Framework (KSF) lies at the heart of the career and pay progression strand of Agenda for Change; linking the KSF requirements to this new curriculum is therefore essential.

The NHS KSF is a developmental system that defines and describes knowledge and skills for NHS staff. It provides a single, consistent, comprehensive and explicit framework for review and development for all staff from a background other than medicine.

Each learning outcome is linked to a KSF competency at the level required by the end of training.

Suitable assessment methods

Each learning outcome will be assessed by multiple methods and by multiple assessors. Suitable methods are outlined in the assessment section. These are described further and blueprinted for assessments and examinations in the curriculum.

Surveillance and assessment of the population's heath and wellbeing

This area of practice focuses on the quantitative and qualitative assessment of the population's health, including managing, analysing, interpreting, and communicating information that relates to the determinants and status of health and wellbeing. Integral to this is the assessment of population needs and its relationship to effective actions.

Learning experiences

By the end of phase 1 registrars will be expected to assess and describe the health status and determinants of health of a defined population by measuring, analysing and interpreting appropriate routine and ad hoc mortality, morbidity data, and subjective health status.

By the end of phase 2 registrars will be expected to have assessed the status, health needs and determinants of health of a (sub) population systematically for a known reason. This will demonstrate use of appropriate qualitative and quantitative methods, including comparison over time, place and person. It will also demonstrate the ability to accurately describe and clearly communicate findings to others and translate surveillance results and assessment into appropriate recommendations for action.

By the end of phase 3 registrars will be expected to demonstrate that action has taken place as a result of their assessment of health status and needs. If no action has occurred then they will understand why and have developed alternative strategies. Registrars will have been assessing health status throughout their training and will have accumulated evidence that they are proficient in the use of a broad range of types of health data in a range of settings.

Potential vehicles for the demonstration of this competence area include:

  • Gathering, analysis and presentation of data for a health report.
  • Data set manipulation and analysis.
  • Development, administration and analysis of questionnaires.
  • Board reports.
  • Health needs assessment.
  • Geographic mapping of health indicators.

Potential settings for the demonstration of this competence area:

By the end of training registrars will be expected to have worked with the following types of health data:

  • mortality;
  • morbidity;
  • cancer registry;
  • local, national and international communicable disease notifications;
  • and laboratory data;
  • demographic;
  • hospital episode statistics;
  • health survey.

They will be expected to have done this in a setting where they can demonstrate the contribution made to decision making at a board/senior management level within a health or partner organisation.

They will need to have analysed data by:

  • geographical levels;
  • by sub-populations;
  • by time;
  • by risk factors.

Links to Knowledge and Skills Framework

  • IK2: Information collection and analysis
  • C6: Equality and Diversity

Knowledge Base

Populations; collection of routine and ad hoc data; demography; life-tables; population projections; population structure and fertility, mortality and migration; the significance of demographic changes for the health of the population and its need for health and related services.

Sources of routine mortality and morbidity data, including primary care data, collection and publication at international, national, regional and district levels; biases and artefacts in population data; methods of classifying health and disease, appreciation of the importance of consistency in definitions and (public health) language. Methods used to measure health status; notification and registration systems; data linkage within and across datasets.

Use of information for health service planning and evaluation; specification and uses of information systems; common measures of health service provision and usage; the uses of mathematical modelling techniques in health service planning; indices of needs for and outcome of services; the strengths, uses, interpretation and limitations of routine health information; use of information technology in the processing and analysis of health services information and in support of the provision of health care.

Assessing the evidence of effectiveness of health and healthcare interventions, programmes and services

This area of practice focuses on the critical assessment of evidence relating to the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of public health interventions, programmes and services including screening. It concerns the application of these skills to practice through planning, audit and evaluation.

Learning experiences

By the end of phase 1 registrars would be expected to understand and apply critical appraisal techniques within simple, well-defined contexts (for example writing a briefing on the evidence for a single, non-contentious issue). Findings and recommendations will be communicated to limited audiences.

By the end of phase 2 registrars would begin to incorporate multiple types of evidence into their recommendations; begin to take a greater lead in the incorporation of evidence into practice and apply this competence in a wider range of situations; and appropriately communicate findings to a wider range of audiences. For example provide support to the development of a business case for a defined service.

By the end of phase 3 registrars would be expected proactively to seek out opportunities for using evidence to influence decisions. They would be working with highly complex issues and would be influencing the deliberations of senior decision-makers. For example, through the development of systems and processes for delivering evidence-based recommendations; the supervision of others; horizon scanning or prioritisation. It is expected that registrars at phase 3 will be using evidence to influence change effectively by incorporating fully the competencies of leadership, surveillance, public health intelligence, and strategy and policy development.

Potential vehicles for the demonstration of this competence area include:

  • Evidence-based policy briefings (for boards, committees, public health colleagues or the public).
  • Writing or appraising business cases.
  • Health Needs Assessment.
  • Press release.
  • Master's level dissertations or assignments.
  • Clinical or public health audit.
  • Development of clinical guidelines.
  • Calculation of population costings for a new technology.
  • Commissioning plan.
  • Health improvement strategy/policy/programme.
  • Peer reviewed publication.

Potential settings for the demonstration of this competence area:

By the end of training registrars will be expected to have undertaken at least three assessments of evidence (one in each phase of training) including critical appraisals of the following study types:

  • ecological;
  • qualitative;
  • aetiological;
  • interventional;
  • and economic.

To encourage a broad experience of assessing evidence, these assessments must vary by:

  • setting (e.g. acute hospital, community health care or other setting such as local government);
  • or risk factor;
  • or sub-population.

Links to Knowledge and Skills Framework

  • C1: Communication; C4: Service Improvement, C5: Quality
  • IK2: Information Collection and Analysis
  • IK3: Knowledge and Information Resources
  • HWB1: Promotion of health and well being and prevention of adverse effects on health and wellbeing
  • G5: Services and Project Management

Knowledge Base

Design and interpretation of studies:
  • skills in the design of research studies;
  • critical appraisal of published papers including the validity of the use of statistical techniques and the inferences drawn from them;
  • ability to draw appropriate conclusions from quantitative and qualitative research.

Screening:

  • principles, methods, applications and organisation of screening for early detection, prevention, treatment and control of disease.

Policy and strategy development and implementation

This area of practice focuses on influencing the development of policies, implementing strategies to put the policies into effect and assessing the impact of policies on health.

A policy is a principle adopted that governs and guides strategy.

A strategy is a formally planned set of actions taken over a long term to address a particular issue.

Learning experiences

By the end of phase 1 registrars will comprehend how public health policy is developed and implemented. They will be able to analyse, in a theoretical context, the effect of policies on health. They will be familiar with national policy for major public health issues. They will devise strategy for problems of low weight and complexity.

By the end of phase 2 registrars will begin to address more complex strategic problems.

By the end of phase 3 registrars will translate national policy into local action, explain the implications and health impact of policy and strategy. They will create and justify policy and strategy for problems of high weight and complexity communicating appropriately for lay, managerial and professional audiences.

Potential vehicles for the demonstration of this competence area include:

  • Writing an essay or dissertation.
  • Preparing a health impact assessment.
  • Developing a local policy.
  • Writing a paper for a Board meeting or equivalent.
  • Leading the local implementation of a national policy.

Potential settings for the demonstration of this competence area:

By the end of training registrars will be expected to have worked on policy analysis, development and implementation in each of the three public health domains (health protection, health improvement and service quality).

Registrars will be expected to appraise the evidence and values that underpin policies and must demonstrate clear understanding of related strategies.

Understanding and development of policy and strategy may relate to local, national or international aspects of health.

Links to Knowledge and Skills Framework

  • C4: Service improvement
  • C5: Quality
  • HWB1: Promotion of health and well being and prevention of adverse effects on health and wellbeing
  • G5: Services and Project Management

Knowledge Base

  • Theories of strategic planning.
  • Principal approaches to policy formation, implementation and evaluation including the relevance of concepts of power, interests and ideology.
  • Knowledge of major national and international policies relevant to public health.
  • Methods of assessing the impact of policies on health.

Strategic leadership and collaborative working for health

This area of practice focuses on leading teams and individuals, building alliances, developing capacity and capability, working in partnership with other practitioners and agencies, and using the media effectively to improve health and well-being.

Learning experiences

By the end of phase 1 registrars will understand different styles of leadership and work effectively as part of a team, showing insight into their own behaviour within teams in different settings. They will display a professional commitment to ethical practice. They will understand the theory of management and change management and manage straight forward projects.

By the end of phase 2 registrars will be part of a multi-disciplinary team, working with and involving other stakeholders as appropriate. They will display critical self appraisal and reflective practice. They will be able to manage projects, manage change and handle uncertainty, the unexpected, challenge and conflict in an appropriate manner. They will have experience of working with the media.

By the end of phase 3 registrars will manage more complex change management situations, understanding and managing the conflict involved and negotiating solutions. They will show appropriate leadership styles in different settings, including multi-agency settings. They will use appropriate communication and advocacy skills in a variety of public health settings, listening and responding appropriately. They will be expected to demonstrate the appropriate management of people and financial resources.

Potential vehicles for the demonstration of this competence area include:

  • Working effectively as part of team.
  • Chairing a multi-disciplinary meeting.
  • Leading a public health project.
  • Successfully completing a change management project.
  • Identifying and engaging stakeholders in projects to improve the public's health.
  • Working with the media.

Potential settings for the demonstration of this competence area:

By the end of training registrars will be expected to have developed leadership skills in each of the three domains of public health and to have worked collaboratively with more than two of the following agencies/organisations:

  • local authorities;
  • regional departments of government and/or national government;
  • consumer groups;
  • clinicians.

The leadership contribution in each setting must be clearly demonstrated by tangible outcomes of delivery and/or demonstrable skill development. Competence is this area may also be demonstrated through work in international public health.

Links to Knowledge and Skills Framework

  • C1: Communication
  • C2: Personal and People Development
  • C4: Service Improvement
  • C5: Quality
  • C6: Equality and Diversity
  • HWB 1: Promotion of Health and Wellbeing; Prevention of Adverse Effects on Health and Wellbeing
  • G5: Services and Project Management

Knowledge Base

Understanding individuals, teams/groups and their development:

  • motivation, creativity and innovation in individuals, and its relationship to group and team dynamics;
  • personal management skills;
  • theories and models of management;
  • leadership and delegation;
  • principles of negotiation and influencing;
  • principles, theories and methods of effective communication (written and oral) including mass communication;
  • the theoretical and practical aspects of power and authority, role and conflict.

Understanding organisations, their function and structure:

  • the internal and external organisational environments - evaluating internal resources and organisational capabilities;
  • identifying and managing internal and external stakeholder interests;
  • structuring and managing interorganisational (network) relationships, including intersectoral work, collaborative working practices and partnerships;
  • social networks and communities of interest;
  • assessing the impact of political, economic, socio-cultural, environmental and other external influences.

Management and change:

  • critical evaluation principles and frameworks for managing change;
  • issues underpinning design and implementation of performance management against goals and objectives.

Health improvement

This area of practice focuses on promoting the health of populations by influencing lifestyle and socio-economic, physical and cultural environment (including sustainable development) and health education directed towards populations, communities and individuals. It involves a theoretical and practical understanding of health improvement in order to work with, and possibly direct, health improvement specialists.

Learning experiences

By the end of phase 1 registrars would be expected to have acquired a firm knowledge base and be able to engage in critical debate with informed colleagues on health improvement.

By the end of phase 2 registrars have started working to apply this knowledge to improve the health of local populations including working in teams to analyse the need for health improvement, plan health improvement activities, implement and communicate those plans.

By the end of phase 3 registrars would be involved in increasingly complex health improvement activities, including community development activity, work with other professionals and understanding barriers to health improvement measures.

Potential vehicles for the demonstration of this competence area include:

  • Briefings for boards, committees, colleagues on health improvement issues.
  • Proposals (business cases) for health improvement activities.
  • Reports and evaluations of health improvement activities showing ability to reflect on own contribution and relate practical experience to theory.
  • Logs of joint projects undertaken (probably in assistant capacity) with health improvement specialists.
  • Elements of Masters submissions.
  • Peer reviewed publications.

Potential settings for the demonstration of this competence area:

By the end of training registrars will be expected to have undertaken health improvement/community development work in both a health care setting, a community setting (which may be work led by non-health organisations such as local government) and in the context of health protection.

Registrars must demonstrate their personal contribution to a specific programme or intervention, and how it is perceived by users and/or the press. They will have considered the health improvement needs of at least one marginalized or disadvantaged group.

For simpler health improvement activities (such as producing a limited local health improvement programme or writing a press release) it is to be expected that the registrar will have taken a lead role before completing training.

For others such as community development programmes or national policy development it is only expected that registrars have been sufficiently closely involved with the processes to understand what the issues are and how more experienced colleagues approach them.

Links to Knowledge and Skills Framework

  • C4: Service Improvement
  • C6: Equality and Diversity
  • HWB 1: Promotion of Health and Wellbeing; Prevention of Adverse Effects on Health and Wellbeing
  • G5: Services and Project Management

Knowledge Base

  • Principles and practice of health promotion and education including:
    • models of behavioural change;
    • definitions of health (physical, mental and social);
    • principles of sustainable development.
  • Ethical and political issues underlying responsibility for health
  • Determinants of health, the prevention paradox
  • Role of regulation, legislation and fiscal measure in promotion of health
  • Evaluation of health education activities including:
    • outcomes;
    • appropriateness of different methods;
    • limitations and strengths of RCT type and qualitative approaches.
  • Risk reduction versus harm minimisation
  • Social marketing theory (diffusion of knowledge)
  • Theory and practice of community development.
    • Strengths and weakness of community development approaches.
    • Practical problems of community development.
    • Place of professional in community development.

Health Protection

This area of practice focuses on the protection of the public's health from communicable and environmental hazards by the application of a range of methods including hazard identification, risk assessment and the promotion and implementation of appropriate interventions to reduce risk and promote health.

Learning experiences

By the end of phase 1 registrars will have a firm knowledge base for communicable disease and environmental hazard control including both general and specific settings. They will also have a working knowledge of the principles of emergency planning. Drawing conclusions from surveillance, the trainee will be able to participate in simple risk assessment and understand the complex nature of risk communication.

By the end of phase 2 registrars would be expected to use data on exposure, potential health effects and outcomes for common hazards to address a real life health protection problem, accessing expertise and other resources as necessary. They would be able to integrate hazard identification, characterisation and assessment into risk assessment for a commonly occurring hazard. The trainee will be exposed to a range of health protection issues and start to demonstrate competence in managing these. They would also be able to meet the educational requirements for commencing supervised on-call and have experience of supervised out of hours emergency work.

By the end of phase 3 registrars would be expected to be able to pull together different types of complex data to draw conclusions for disease control, environmental and chemical hazards control as well as health improvement in the health protection context. They will be able to demonstrate and integrate all public health skills in a health protection context including health intelligence, assessment of effectiveness, policy development, leadership and risk communication and have undertaken health improvement and health service quality work. Registrars will recognise and work within the limits of their professional competence in relation to out of hours emergency work.

Note: Many competencies in other key areas are essential for health protection practice and are not repeated in the list of Key Area 6 competencies. These include KAs 1 + 8 for surveillance and KA 4 for communication.

It is important for training breadth to ensure that, during phase 3 of training, some core competencies are developed in a health protection context as the three months during phase two spent in a health protection unit may not be enough time to cover this. (Examples are when health protection is just one element of a holistic approach e.g. settings like prisons or schools; risk groups like asylum seekers or intravenous drug users; diseases such as asthma or COPD; services like sexual health, etc or when health intelligence, health improvement or service improvement skills are applied to problems related to communicable or environmentally related diseases in general service based work).

Some essential health protection experience cannot be guaranteed during the three month attachment (e.g. outbreak investigation/management) and may instead be covered during phase 3.

Some competencies will be further developed by doing on-call. On-call does not start until phase 2, requiring a firm knowledge base. The specific competencies to be assessed for competence to start out of hours on-call are detailed separately.

Potential vehicles for the demonstration of this competence area include:

  • Workplace based assessment e.g. on-call scenarios.
  • Scenario based exercises.
  • Reports (including outbreak/incident reports) and peer reviewed publications.
  • Presentation of material at peer groups, internal peer audit or external meetings or conferences.

Potential settings for the demonstration of this competence area:

By the end of training registrars will have dealt with a broad range of communicable disease and environmental incidents and threats to health in both health care and community settings, including participating in the management of a significant outbreak.

Work overseas or work relating to aspects of international public health protection will also provide opportunity to demonstrate competence in this area of practice.

Links to Knowledge and Skills Framework

  • C1: Communication
  • C2: Personal and People Development
  • C4: Service Improvement
  • HWB 3: Protection of Health and Wellbeing
  • IK2: Information Collection and Analysis
  • G5: Services and Project Management

Knowledge Base

Epidemiology (including microbial epidemiology), and biology (including microbiology) of communicable diseases.

Health and social behaviour: in relation to risk of infectious and environmental diseases.

Environment:

  • environmental determinants of disease and their control;
  • risk and hazard;
  • legislation in environmental control;
  • environmental monitoring;
  • factors affecting health and safety at work;
  • occupation and health;
  • transport policies and health impact assessment for environmental pollution;
  • chemical incident management.

Communicable disease:

  • definitions, surveillance;
  • methods of control;
  • the design, evaluation, and management of immunisation programmes;
  • outbreak investigation including the use of relevant epidemiological methods;
  • causes, distribution, natural history, clinical presentation, methods of diagnosis and control of infections of local and international public health importance;
  • organisation of infection control;
  • international aspects of hazard control, national and international public health legislation and its application.

Health protection service issues:

  • the development, commissioning and evaluation of the services required for protecting health, including:
    • sexual health;
    • TB;
    • immunisations;
    • infection control;
    • antibiotic resistance;
    • occupational health;
    • travel health;
  • screening and the need for services in particular settings and in high risk groups (e.g. prisons, with asylum seekers, in dental health).

Health and social service quality

This area of practice covers commissioning, clinical governance, quality improvement, patient safety, equity of service provision and prioritisation of health and social care services.

Learning experiences

By the end of phase 1 registrars should know the basic principles of commissioning, clinical governance, quality improvement, patient safety, equity of service provision and prioritisation related to this area.

By the end of phase 2 registrars should know how to collate and assess relevant evidence and make recommendations for service change and prioritisation.

By the end of phase 3 registrars should have implemented and led change in some of the areas above. They will also have proactively sought out opportunities to use evidence to influence decisions. They will have worked on highly complex issues and influenced the decisions of senior decision-makers both within and across organisations and outside it.

Potential vehicles for the demonstration of this competence area include:

  • Evidence briefings providing recommendations for policy (for boards, committees, public health colleagues, the public).
  • Writing or appraising business cases and service specifications.
  • Health needs assessment.
  • Press releases.
  • Clinical or public health audit and governance reports.
  • Development of clinical guidelines and quality standards.
  • Calculation of population costings for new technologies.
  • Reports on commissioning and delivery of clinical services.
  • Quality improvement strategy/policy/programmes.
  • Peer reviewed publication.

Potential settings for the demonstration of this competence area:

By the end of training registrars will be expected to have been involved in work in developing, evaluating, improving and commissioning health and social care services.

Work must include at least two of the following:

  • an acute service setting (including clinical networks);
  • a primary care setting;
  • a mental health care setting;
  • a health protection context and a wider preventive/community setting.

These may be at local and/or regional/national level.

Links to Knowledge and Skills Framework

  • C1: Communication
  • C2: Personal and People Development
  • C4: Service Improvement
  • HWB 3: Protection of Health and Wellbeing
  • IK2: Information Collection and Analysis
  • G5: Services and Project Management

Knowledge Base

  • Research methods appropriate to public health practice, including:
    • epidemiology;
    • statistical methods;
    • other methods of enquiry including qualitative research methods.
  • Disease causation and the diagnostic process in relation to public health; prevention and health promotion
  • Health information and audit methodology
  • Medical sociology
  • Social policy
  • Health economics
  • Organisation and management of health care and health care programmes from a public health perspective
  • Ethical and legal frameworks
  • Clinical governance

Public health intelligence

This area of practice focuses on the systems and strategies that are essential for organisations to base practice and policy on sound intelligence. It uses the skills of key areas 1 and 2 to establish intelligence systems, integrating the skills and methods of routine and ad hoc data and research evidence into systems and strategies.

This area involves a clear understanding of the systems and capacity needed to deliver surveillance and early warning functions and costs effective interventions. This includes the quantification of performance management systems for health care and public health systems. This area addresses systems that should deliver intelligence using formats and methods that are relevant to particular needs and specific to particular audiences.

Learning experiences

By the end of phase 1 registrars will know the different sorts of intelligence and how they are used by practitioners, decision makers and policy makers.

By the end of phase 2 registrars will know a wide range of specific sources of intelligence including their quality and relevance in specific circumstances. They will be capable, and will have had experience, of assembling such intelligence to provide valued decision support to practitioners, senior decision makers and policy makers.

By the end of phase 3 registrars will be skilled at working with senior management in understanding the intelligence systems required to develop interventions to address the needs* of sub populations served. Registrars will be able to effectively use public health intelligence in the development, implementation and evaluation of policies and strategies. The registrar will understand how to evaluate their actions and will be able to identify why/if a contribution appears to have been unvalued or unsuccessful and have subsequently developed alternative strategies. By the end of training registrars will be expected to have contributed to the surveillance of the public's health from within, or via, a local, regional or national intelligence unit.

*needs as expressed through population preference and through objective measurements

Potential vehicles for the demonstration of this competence area include:

  • Implementation of national surveillance policy.
  • Quality assurance activity.
  • Data flow analysis.
  • Development of systems to extract intelligence and decision support from data sets.
  • Production of a major data rich report (e.g. public health annual report).

Potential settings for the demonstration of this competence area:

Learning outcomes in health intelligence can be gained in service work through links with specialist health intelligence units such as:

  • public health observatories;
  • cancer registries;
  • QA reference centres.

Work in academic departments and health protection will expose registrars to public health intelligence.

Links to Knowledge and Skills Framework

  • C1: Communication
  • IK2: Information Collection and Analysis
  • IK3: Knowledge and Information Resources

Knowledge Base

  • Advanced techniques in surveillance and dissemination
  • Methods of trending and modelling health status
    • Linkage of data sets.
    • Design of knowledge management systems for both data and research literature (libraries).
    • The role of ICT in intelligence based and evidence based decision support.
    • Integration of clinical data systems and population based systems to reduce inequalities and improve health.
    • Technical, legal and ethical issues relating to data security, disclosure and trust.
    • Pseudonymisation.
  • The role of information and intelligence in policy formulation and implementation, and in local clinical and public health practice.

Academic public health

This area of practice focuses on the teaching of and research into public health audiences.

Learning experiences

By the end of phase 1 registrars should understand the important areas of uncertainty in public health and have the ability to distinguish those areas which are amenable to research, and how, within available resources. The importance of these uncertainties should be related ultimately to potential population health gain. The main outlines of the methods for effective research in public health should be understood with reference to public health problems for which the optimum solution is unclear.

By the end of phase 2 registrars will be able to distinguish evidence-based strategies from others and prioritise accordingly and will have participated in some teaching. They will have presented in an academic setting of critical peers.

By the end of phase 3 registrars will have demonstrated their ability to teach reflectively and with enthusiasm, in class and individually, will have had experience of or observed prioritising, writing and presenting research findings. They will demonstrate an ability to write proposals, to critique research substantively and have used one or more research methodologies to support current service or academic work, disseminating findings appropriately. By the end of training registrars will be expected to have undertaken some original research in association with an academic unit and taught public health to a range of audiences.

Potential vehicles for the demonstration of this competence area include:

  • Written research reports including literature reviews.
  • Course documentation, demonstrating participation in design and/or delivery.
  • Conference proceedings.
  • Diplomas and higher degrees.
  • Published peer reviewed papers.
  • Articles in the media.
  • Referees reports on other people's articles submitted for publications.
  • Research proposals submitted (possibly in collaboration).
  • Peer observation of teaching and student feedback.
  • Teaching or research prizes.
  • Book chapters, etc.

Potential settings for the demonstration of this competence area:

  • Research methodologies can be demonstrated in service and academic settings both in original research and in support of other work.
  • Academic public health competence could also be gained in health protection settings.
  • Public health could be taught to a range of audiences including medical students, other health care professionals and local authority staff.

Links to Knowledge and Skills Framework

  • IK2: Information Collection and Analysis
  • IK3: Knowledge and Information Resources
  • G5: Services and Project Management
  • G7: Capacity and Capability

Knowledge Base

  • Epidemiology, statistics, economic evaluation and qualitative research methods.
  • Social and health psychological sciences.
  • Biological, social, environmental and therapeutic determinants of health and disease.
  • Mechanism of therapeutic interventions, including complex interventions.
  • Educational theory, principles of setting learning objectives, curriculum development, GMC documents, course evaluation and student assessment.
  • Research governance, research ethics, confidentiality and privacy of personal data.

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Learning outcomes for key areas 1-9

The learning outcomes database lists the learning outcomes for each of the nine key areas. These are presented as a table which links specific learning outcomes with their:

  • target phase for achievement;
  • the related KSF competency;
  • and related key areas.

The full learning outcomes framework includes the learning outcomes listed as a part of Ethical management of self and Professionalism. It describes the behaviours and attitudes necessary for professional practice.

As well as being a comprehensive list of all the required learning outcomes and their target phase of achievement, this list can be filtered, allowing users to create a personalised version. Individual learning outcomes can be expanded to show related KSF competencies and related curriculum areas.

By using the 'remove' button on expanded learning outcomes, users can delete those learning outcomes that they do not want included in their final personalised list.

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